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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Monday, September 18, 2017 by Father Ruby
During the month of October we celebrate two rather different events in our history. The first one is Columbus Day when we celebrate the man who discovered America.
From the Desk of Jessica Mead
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 by Jessica Mead
If you attend LOSS support group meetings you may be able to appreciate that sometimes meetings are really good, and you leave feeling energized and supported; but other times you think it was just okay, or perhaps it was not helpful at all. While we hope that most meetings are good and supportive we know that various factors can make the experience just okay for survivors at times. I have left my fair share of meetings wishing that I had said something different or connected with a lone member a bit more, but this past month I facilitated one of those exceptional meetings. I left feeling humbled, grateful and honored to be a part of the LOSS program. As the meeting started I looked around the room and had the thought that in no other sector of life would such a diverse group of people be coming together. I wondered how this eclectic group of individuals were going to relate.

Archives:

Can a Loving Parent Create Obstacles to a Child’s Grief Process?
Thursday, September 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Parental bereavement is one of the most stressful experiences that a child can face. And sudden death, such as suicide, will usually impact children with some level of trauma because a primary  attachment bond has been  spontaneously disrupted, even violated, under circumstances that may have involved violence or exposure to the scene of death.  Consider that a child’s capacity to express and integrate aspects of grief will be limited by her current age and development.  But with support, a bereaved child will grow into a more mature understanding of the loss and internalize meaningful memories of the deceased parent.
Starting Over
Monday, August 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
our family has experienced a suicide.  In its wake the world feels different and much of what once mattered now feels less meaningful...  The first weeks and months after a suicide are disorienting, and your energy is drained.  You are only trying to survive the shock, the relentless questions, the unyielding despair. You find yourself looking for solutions because fulfilling your role as a parent has become infinitely harder.  Your children and teens are presenting with grief symptoms that you don’t understand.  Are they grieving???