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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Monday, September 18, 2017 by Father Ruby
During the month of October we celebrate two rather different events in our history. The first one is Columbus Day when we celebrate the man who discovered America.
Restoring Family Stability after a Suicide
Monday, September 18, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Every family has various needs for structure. As they grow, families will create the rules and routines that support their ability to function. We know that families have different resources and various amounts of structure supporting day-to-day living, but if they have inadequate structure and routine for too long there can be emotional and behavioral reactions.

Archives:

From the Desk of Deborah Major
Thursday, October 01, 2015 by Deborah Major
Experiencing the death of a loved one by suicide is among the most painful, bewildering losses that anyone can be asked to endure.  When the newly bereaved first call the LOSS Program seeking support, we hear the pain and confusion in their voices and in their questions.  Dying by suicide seems so senseless and so unnecessary to the vast majority who come seeking grief support.  The early emotional reactions, somatic symptoms, and intrusive ruminations about the loved one’s last moments feel unbearable, while at the same time they replay in a relentless loop that seems inescapable. 
Intrusive Images in Children After Suicide
Thursday, October 01, 2015 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
When a parent is faced with the task of telling children that a sibling or a parent has died by suicide, there is usually a sense of dread and heartbreak.  The parent is overwhelmed with the loss and its circumstances.  How is it possible to expect a child or teen, in innocence, to make sense of a loved one’s suicide?  We must start with a compassionate explanation for this manner of death; one that flies in the face of the great stigma attached to suicide that blames the person who died.