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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Father Ruby
Oftentimes I have heard from people surviving a death from suicide that their souls seem dead. This crushing blow has literally deadened one’s spirit. All around survivors the world goes on but for the survivor the world has come to a crashing halt. The world has stopped and unfortunately survivors cannot get off.
Our Grief and Our Children
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Families are little systems that respond to change on inter-related levels. Think of suicide loss within a family as producing seismic change. While individual elements of our lives have survived the loss, such as other loved ones, home, car and job, they may no longer seem familiar.

Archives:

From the desk of Father Rubey
Sunday, November 01, 2015 by Father Rubey
During the month of November we celebrate the feast of Thanksgiving which is one of the great American celebrations. It is a day when families gather to watch football and have a great meal of turkey and all of the trimmings. A lot of work goes into preparation for the day. All of the shopping that is done is for the food to make the day a real love feast. People try to outdo each other as they prepare the meal. A lot of love goes into the preparation for this day. In many instances Thanksgiving stretches into the whole weekend, it is more than just one day. Families are able to enjoy each other and each other’s presence. It is a great family celebration. Generally, people are in great moods because they are not tired out from running all over the place. 
From the Desk of Deborah Major
Thursday, October 01, 2015 by Deborah Major
Experiencing the death of a loved one by suicide is among the most painful, bewildering losses that anyone can be asked to endure.  When the newly bereaved first call the LOSS Program seeking support, we hear the pain and confusion in their voices and in their questions.  Dying by suicide seems so senseless and so unnecessary to the vast majority who come seeking grief support.  The early emotional reactions, somatic symptoms, and intrusive ruminations about the loved one’s last moments feel unbearable, while at the same time they replay in a relentless loop that seems inescapable.