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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Father Ruby
In one of the recent LOSS support groups participants found themselves talking about the impact of stigma they experienced in the wake of their loved one’s deaths. Our groups are intended to be a safe place for survivors to meet others and talk about any struggles they are experiencing. There are many things that make suicide more painful and disorienting for those left behind, and one of those things is the experience of stigma.
Private Grief Stories
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
On 9/11/17 I was watching speeches and ceremony regarding America’s evolving grief in the wake of its huge loss of life on 9/11/01. The anniversary events were beautifully intentional, formal and moving. I thought about Emily Dickenson’s verse: “After great pain, a formal feeling comes.” And I couldn’t help but think about our LOSS families. Is it odd that I might connect those experiencing the devastation of suicide loss with this grand scale, national observation of lost lives and collective meaning?

Archives:

Exploring Transformation after Loss
Wednesday, February 01, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
In witnessing the courageous grief work of so many adolescents and adults, I draw inspiration. Suicide loss can be counted as an immense, life-changing event for which no one is prepared. Such a fundamental loss means change, within and without, for the surviving person, couple and family. How can we enter into a compulsory change process productively?  How do we address our grief within a marriage or family system when our grief response has such a powerful impact on those who depend on us? 
When Teens Grieve a Sibling’s Suicide
Sunday, January 01, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW & Deborah Major, PhD, LCSW
Family systems are often initially paralyzed by the suicide death of a child, with parents being the primary focus of grief support, as suicide grief literature has identified the loss of a child as among the most devastating for parents.   A 2005 study on sibling suicide bereavement for children who are still at home identify these children and adolescents as “the forgotten bereaved,” where  “necessary help is impeded due to the extraordinary experience leaving siblings outside the circle of friends and parental grief community”  (Dyregrov  &  Dyregrov, 2005).