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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Monday, September 18, 2017 by Father Ruby
During the month of October we celebrate two rather different events in our history. The first one is Columbus Day when we celebrate the man who discovered America.
Restoring Family Stability after a Suicide
Monday, September 18, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Every family has various needs for structure. As they grow, families will create the rules and routines that support their ability to function. We know that families have different resources and various amounts of structure supporting day-to-day living, but if they have inadequate structure and routine for too long there can be emotional and behavioral reactions.

Archives:

Managing Family Strife After a Suicide
Friday, August 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
When a suicide occurs, the surviving family structure undergoes enormous stress as it attempts to reestablish equilibrium.  Traumatic loss is always highly disruptive, and individuals within the family may find themselves needing to balance, or even postpone grief as they mobilize toward the re-creation of a secure base.  Interpersonal conflict within the family at this time represents increased disruption and further distraction from the need to grieve.  It is rather common that immediate and extended family members respond to the suicide death with accusations, threats or relationship cut-offs, resulting in additional and very painful challenges for survivors.   Engaging with conflict and marshalling the energy to defend one’s self, or to protect children from adult issues can derail stabilization efforts and complicate grief for an entire family system in need of grief’s healing processes.
Child’s Mind Grief: Processing Suicide Losses with Younger Children
Tuesday, July 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
This article is inspired by the presence and thoughtfulness of your younger children, aged two to ten, who have received services in the LOSS Program for Children and Youth. At its inception, our clinicians with considerable background in child therapy could not anticipate the extent and depth to which we would witness the young as they opened themselves to the work of grief. When we consider the universality of grief, how readily do we think of it as an active mind and body process with the potential to advance development in young children? When we make space in our minds for young children to respond uninhibitedly to their experience, we do see them grow.