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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Father Ruby
In one of the recent LOSS support groups participants found themselves talking about the impact of stigma they experienced in the wake of their loved one’s deaths. Our groups are intended to be a safe place for survivors to meet others and talk about any struggles they are experiencing. There are many things that make suicide more painful and disorienting for those left behind, and one of those things is the experience of stigma.
Private Grief Stories
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Private Grief Stories
On 9/11/17 I was watching speeches and ceremony regarding America’s evolving grief in the wake of its huge loss of life on 9/11/01. The anniversary events were beautifully intentional, formal and moving. I thought about Emily Dickenson’s verse: “After great pain, a formal feeling comes.” And I couldn’t help but think about our LOSS families. Is it odd that I might connect those experiencing the devastation of suicide loss with this grand scale, national observation of lost lives and collective meaning?

Archives:

Reading How We Grieve; Relearning the World by Thomas Attig.
Sunday, June 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
When a suicide takes place the world may take on an alien quality for those who are left shaking in the aftermath, and restoration of individual and family life entails change and re-examination of our assumptions about living in the world that may not have been questioned in the past.  The loss propels the survivor into a new, very personal transformation that can mightily challenge the person emotionally, behaviorally, cognitively and spiritually. The world has changed.
From the Desk of Fr. Rubey
Sunday, June 01, 2014 by Father Rubey
During the month of June we remember our Fathers on Father’s Day. It is a day that is set aside to remember our Fathers in a very special way –whether they are living or deceased. It is an especially painful day for Fathers who are grieving the loss of a child from suicide or any other form of death. It is also painful for those people who are grieving the loss of a Father from suicide or any other form of death. There will not be a gift from that person who is deceased or there will not be a gift for that Father who is deceased. The deaths are painful reminders of the permanence of the act. There will be no more gifts or cards either for or from that person who found life too painful to continue. If only death was not permanent but it is. That is the tragic effect of taking one’s life. Life is gone forever and there is no turning back or repairing. If only that loved one had given a little more thought to the ramifications of their actions. But the fact of the matter is that the pain had become so unbearable that another minute would seem like an eternity and impossible to endure for even a nanosecond. That is hard for survivors to conceive but it is the truth.