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LOSS Program Office
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Chicago, IL 60654

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Featured this Month:

Keeper of Memories
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
I’d like to extend some brief thoughts about family grief through the holidays. There is a lot written on the subject to be found on the internet and various bereavement books. No wonder, because holiday traditions have “normal” and “what we always do” baked into them. When a loved one central to the family has died from suicide, these days can be approached with perhaps too much hope that they will help us feel better, or only dread or confusion.

Archives:

From the desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 by Father Rubey
In December, most of us celebrate holiday events of different religious traditions. The season can stir up a lot of feelings for survivors of a suicide. The season can be very painful for grieving people because there is gaiety and celebration all around us. Grieving people are in no mood to celebrate and would like the holiday season to be stricken from the calendar. That is not going to happen any time soon – if ever. Grieving survivors wonder if they will ever be happy again or feel like living again. 
Grief and Family Development
Tuesday, December 1, 2015 by Deborah R. Major, PhD, LCSW
Grieving the loss of a loved one to suicide is probably a lifelong process for adults and children alike.  This doesn’t mean that the pain associated with the loss will remain the same over time.  We know there are survivors reading these columns whose loved one died as recently as a few weeks ago, while others are remembering a loss that is many years in the past.  Integration of the loss takes place over time for adults and children, but with important developmental differences.