Get Help Now!  (312) 655-7700
 

Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by From the Desk of Father Rubey
In January, we begin a New Year and many of us have New Year’s resolutions such as losing weight, getting more exercise or doing something positive to improve our lives such as being more understanding towards our loved ones. Former Vice President Joe Biden recently came out with a memoir detailing events in his life and what he learned from the tragedies.
Empty Space
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a spouse’s suicide surviving parents may look into the rooms of their home and see remnants of a family life that is upside down. As a family begins to acclimate to the disorder posed by the beginning of the grief journey, it might be useful to realize that a world where meaningful structure has been disabled by a traumatic loss adds an element of strangeness in familiar spaces.

Archives:

Grieving Over Time
Tuesday, April 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
What is the quality of grief that has been present in the life of a surviving person for quite some time? We want to give voice to this indefinite, very personal process of moving through grief after the quaking and shaking has subsided.  A survivor has come to a point of uneasy stillness, and she cannot see her future.
Watching for Depression in the Grieving Family
Saturday, March 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
During counseling intakes for the LOSS Program for Children and Youth we often hear parents’ concerns that their child may be depressed or will develop a serious depression in response to the suicide loss of a parent, sibling or someone close to them. We are glad to hear caregivers express this concern at the outset because it conveys understanding that the loss can be life-changing and the needs of each person in the surviving family have changed. Watching and assessing grieving children is the right response, and distinguishing grief from depression calls for the experience of a clinician or good, basic mental health information. The caregiving adult who attempts to monitor the grief responses of children and adolescents needs a sense of what healthy grief involves and what could be problematic.