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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Father Ruby
Oftentimes I have heard from people surviving a death from suicide that their souls seem dead. This crushing blow has literally deadened one’s spirit. All around survivors the world goes on but for the survivor the world has come to a crashing halt. The world has stopped and unfortunately survivors cannot get off.
Our Grief and Our Children
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Families are little systems that respond to change on inter-related levels. Think of suicide loss within a family as producing seismic change. While individual elements of our lives have survived the loss, such as other loved ones, home, car and job, they may no longer seem familiar.

Archives:

When Younger Children Learn About Suicide
Monday, September 01, 2014 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Occasionally, during the intake of a  family with children into the LOSS Program for Children and Youth, a parent of a younger child voices concern about what the child might do with information that his or her loved one died by suicide.  The parent may express worry that the child will tell others who would use it to tease the child or to spread gossip.  It is understandable that parents would want to protect children from the misuse of information about a suicide loss.  Because of a lingering stigma attached to suicide, insecurity about how the world will respond is common.   It may require some new thinking on the part of parents if they become aware that their child’s needs around the information doesn’t line up with their own needs or concerns.
Reflections from Jessica Mead
Friday, August 01, 2014 by Jessica Mead
In a recent Workshop on adaptive grieving, I was asked to participate in an exercise where I responded to questions about a significant person in my life who had died. My colleague began asking me questions like, “What kinds of things did your loved one teach you about life?” And, “What strengths did she/he see in you?” These were questions that no one had ever asked me before.  I found myself really enjoying answering them. As I answered, I was able to reflect on my own qualities and characteristics that I had never connected to my father before. It made me think about how much I missed talking about him. Now that it has been 9 years since his death, there are fewer people in my life who knew him well. I no longer live in my childhood home where neighbors and friends would tell me a story about how he helped them do something in their yard. I no longer keep in contact with many of the friends that I had then, and many of our family members who knew my dad for his lifetime have passed away. This exercise really got me thinking about my grief journey, past and present.