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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Father Ruby
In one of the recent LOSS support groups participants found themselves talking about the impact of stigma they experienced in the wake of their loved one’s deaths. Our groups are intended to be a safe place for survivors to meet others and talk about any struggles they are experiencing. There are many things that make suicide more painful and disorienting for those left behind, and one of those things is the experience of stigma.
Private Grief Stories
Thursday, October 19, 2017 by Private Grief Stories
On 9/11/17 I was watching speeches and ceremony regarding America’s evolving grief in the wake of its huge loss of life on 9/11/01. The anniversary events were beautifully intentional, formal and moving. I thought about Emily Dickenson’s verse: “After great pain, a formal feeling comes.” And I couldn’t help but think about our LOSS families. Is it odd that I might connect those experiencing the devastation of suicide loss with this grand scale, national observation of lost lives and collective meaning?

Archives:

Helping Grieving Children Through the Holidays
Sunday, December 01, 2013 by Jodi Rule-Rouse and Linda Ranson Jacobs
Adults play an important role in helping children grieve, especially over the holidays when new emotions and memories can hit with full force. Children often have trouble expressing their emotions, and when they see their parents hurting, they naturally want to protect their parents, so the children may not be open about their own grief. Close family friends and even other relatives can step in and assist the parent in helping the children grieve. The following are tips that a parent or another adult can use to help grieving children through the holidays.
From the Desk of...Father Rubey
Sunday, December 01, 2013 by Father Rubey
During December many of us celebrate Christmas and Hanukkah which are very happy times for the celebrants. It is the festival of lights where there is a lot of gaiety and celebrations. Families come together and exchange gifts and eat all different types of food. I remember years ago I went to spend Christmas with my family in Ireland. My cousin shared with me that many Christmases the main meal was ruined because there was too much celebrating and she forgot that the meal was in the oven. One of the key elements of this season is the giving of gifts. Small children get their lists together for Santa with the hopes that Santa will honor all of the requests. This time of the year is also a very painful time for those who are grieving the death of a loved one from suicide. There is and always will be a key loved one who is missing from the gatherings. The first few Christmases are especially painful for those left behind because this loved one is sorely missed and there is a major void in the gathering and there is a gift missing from this loved one and a lost opportunity to buy something for this loved one.