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LOSS Program Office
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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 by Father Ruby
The great American holiday is celebrated on the 4th of July. This is a day when we commemorate the event when our Founding Leaders fought to throw off the shackles of an oppressive regime. These people fought and many of them died in order to create a more humane environment. While our country is not perfect it certainly enables all of us to live free and have many opportunities to live out our dreams and pursue our goals. For this we give thanks that out Founding Leaders had the courage and the foresight to follow their dreams and aspirations. They created an environment and produced a road map that we follow to this day. Our country has gotten better over the centuries as our leaders have perfected and refined the original documents that gave our country its beginning. Our country has evolved since the first shots were fired and the shackles were thrown off.
Listening to Young Children’s Grief
Thursday, May 11, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
The grief responses of parentally bereaved pre-school aged children can be easy to overlook. They are very oriented to the present, see death as reversible and their separation distress is expressed in brief episodes. Affection and attentive caregiving go a long way for bereaved children. In previous articles we have talked about the importance of attunement of the caregiver to the child’s temperament, the necessity of routine, relaxation and play, and supporting the child’s continued development. Yet, even with the essential stable base, a grieving young child’s needs may be more complex than simply coping with absence. Sometimes, children struggle with grief challenges that are tied to their particular relationship with the deceased parent, and the nature of that relationship can influence their interpretation of the parent’s sudden absence.

Archives:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Father Rubey
Reprinted from December 1999

Two religious traditions celebrate joyful religious holidays during the month of December. Our Jewish brothers and sisters celebrate the Festival of Lights. Our Christian brothers and sisters celebrate the birth of Jesus. Both traditions are joyful and uplifting events. There are family gatherings and there is an emphasis on gift giving for both of these traditions.
Private and Shared Stories of Loss
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief, like any other emotional experience within a family, involves interplay between private and shared realities. Family members will often actively express and share, question and comment, especially in response to a loss that was sudden and unexpected. A suicide elicits not only shock, but a compelling need to make sense of what happened. This is a narrative process that is determined by developmental capacity, and even younger children will listen and wonder and protest a loved one’s sudden death.