Get Help Now!  (312) 655-7700
  Do You Need Rent, SNAP or Utility Assistance?

Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

Keeper of Memories
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
I’d like to extend some brief thoughts about family grief through the holidays. There is a lot written on the subject to be found on the internet and various bereavement books. No wonder, because holiday traditions have “normal” and “what we always do” baked into them. When a loved one central to the family has died from suicide, these days can be approached with perhaps too much hope that they will help us feel better, or only dread or confusion.
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Father Ruby
Oftentimes I have heard from people surviving a death from suicide that their souls seem dead. This crushing blow has literally deadened one’s spirit. All around survivors the world goes on but for the survivor the world has come to a crashing halt. The world has stopped and unfortunately survivors cannot get off.

Archives:

From the desk of Jessica Mead
Friday, November 01, 2013 by Jessica Mead
We all know that suicide is different. There is something about it that makes the grief process feel different and more complex.  Suicide is traumatic; most of us never expected our loved ones to die in this way. Not only were their deaths unexpected and tragic, but many survivors walk in on the scene of death to discover their loved one’s body, and others witness their loved one’s death, each adding another complex layer of trauma to the already difficult and complex grieving process. I meet many people who heal and grow in the face of such trauma, but it is important to consciously recognize the pain of the loss and find some form of outward expression in order to promote healing.
Younger Children and Parental Loss
Friday, November 01, 2013 by Cynthia Waderlow, MSE, LCSW
Younger children are mysterious in that they can be amazingly honest and straightforward and equally abstract.  Children as young as age two and three can already mask feelings and defend against the reality of a loss.  We see a range of grief responses and adaptation to death, just as we do in adults, and similar to adults, a stable home base plays a role in the adjustment process.