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LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

Caring for Trauma Reactive Children after a Suicide Loss
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
In a suicide bereaved family it is conceivable that each survivor bears some level of trauma. The sudden intrusion of paramedics, ambulances and police with flashing lights, witnessing distraught reactions of parents and especially, exposure to the scene of death will impact the central nervous system of every family member. Even those not physically present at the time the suicide is discovered may be disturbed by intrusive imaginary images and sounds. Parents who seek counseling for their bereaved children know that this loss feels incomprehensible and has far-reaching impact. Whether a child openly shows reactivity and emotional dysregulation or has learned to mask their distress it is smart to assess for trauma. Not all traumatic experiences meet the clinical level of Posttraumatic Stress Syndrome, as defined by the DSM-5, but the extraordinary and shocking nature of suicide loss can give rise to trauma symptoms, which include intrusive remembering, emotional numbing and avoidance as well as general hyper-arousal. Intrusive remembering can look like recurrent disturbing dreams, flashbacks of the experience or heightened reactions to reminders of the loss.
From the desk of Deborah Major
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 by Deborah Major
When LOSS members first come to our support groups we sometimes hear them say, “I know I’ll never ‘get over’ this.” Or they might ask, “Does anyone ever ‘get over’ this?” We also hear these same worries from clients in individual counseling.

Archives:

Private and Shared Stories of Loss
Thursday, December 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief, like any other emotional experience within a family, involves interplay between private and shared realities. Family members will often actively express and share, question and comment, especially in response to a loss that was sudden and unexpected. A suicide elicits not only shock, but a compelling need to make sense of what happened. This is a narrative process that is determined by developmental capacity, and even younger children will listen and wonder and protest a loved one’s sudden death. 
Children’s Autonomy During Grief
Saturday, October 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
The LOSS Program has welcomed many members who have openly shared their grief.  Over the years a culture has developed to create a rhythm and ritual for intentional grieving in the lives of adult survivors who attend groups or individual counseling.  Additionally, the Obelisk goes out monthly to promote healthy perspectives and allow narratives of loss and remembrance to be shared.