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LOSS Program Office
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Chicago, IL 60654

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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
4 days ago by Father Ruby
In May our country celebrates Mother’s Day which is a day when we honor our Mothers who are still here and fondly remember those Mothers who are a part of the hereafter. For those Mothers who are grieving the death of a child from suicide or those children who are grieving the loss of a Mother from suicide this is an especially painful day.
From the Desk of Debbie Major
Wednesday, March 14, 2018 by Debbie Major
When you lose a loved one to suicide, there is so much work involved in getting back to living; so much work involved in getting to a place of wanting to reclaim your life.

Archives:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, May 11, 2017 by Father Ruby
In June, we set aside a day to honor our fathers. It is a day where we buy a gift or do something special for our fathers. The traditional gifts that fathers are given on this day range from a shirt, a tie or something for the toolbox, or something else manly. Those gifts are contrasted with the gifts we give to our mother – flowers, a box of candy or something more feminine. The cards are different. Very often a Father’s Day card has a scene that is something from the outdoors or something that is masculine as opposed to the cards that we have for our mothers. Even the messages very often lack the warmth and the care that it has in cards that are meant for our mothers. The biggest day of the year for cemetery visitation is Mother’s Day. Why not Father’s Day?
From the Desk of Father Rubey
Wednesday, March 22, 2017 by Father Rubey
I recently had the opportunity to co-facilitate one of our monthly grief support groups. Fully half of the group members were totally new to LOSS, having lost their loved ones to suicide just a couple of months ago. Many different relationship losses were represented and the ages of those who had died reached across the life span. Some group members had prior awareness of their loved one’s struggles and vulnerabilities, while others had absolutely no idea that this tragedy could ever be a possibility in their family. And while they told different stories of their loved ones’ path to suicide, they shared similar concerns and questions. I imagine that some were also wrestling with questions or doubts that they may not have wanted to voice, yet.