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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
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Chicago, IL 60654

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Featured this Month:

Our Grief and Our Children
Wednesday, June 13, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Families are little systems that respond to change on inter-related levels. Think of suicide loss within a family as producing seismic change. While individual elements of our lives have survived the loss, such as other loved ones, home, car and job, they may no longer seem familiar.
Honesty after Loss
Thursday, May 17, 2018 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Grief has been said to strip away everything that is non-essential, a distillation process. But after the gaping shock of a suicide, the mind of the survivor is beset with layers of questions and conflicting narratives.

Archives:

Loss and Learning
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a sudden loss like suicide, families are reeling. Parents may feel like they have lost energy and find that hopeless feelings, apathy or frustration are affecting their interactions with children and teens. Children, in response, may be furtive and watchful of your tears and despair at home, while looking for normalcy in school or with friends outside the home.
Listening to Young Children’s Grief
Thursday, May 11, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
The grief responses of parentally bereaved pre-school aged children can be easy to overlook. They are very oriented to the present, see death as reversible and their separation distress is expressed in brief episodes. Affection and attentive caregiving go a long way for bereaved children. In previous articles we have talked about the importance of attunement of the caregiver to the child’s temperament, the necessity of routine, relaxation and play, and supporting the child’s continued development. Yet, even with the essential stable base, a grieving young child’s needs may be more complex than simply coping with absence. Sometimes, children struggle with grief challenges that are tied to their particular relationship with the deceased parent, and the nature of that relationship can influence their interpretation of the parent’s sudden absence.