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LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

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From the Desk of Father Rubey
Thursday, September 01, 2016 by Father Rubey
In September, we celebrate Labor Day and that has unofficially become the end of the summer months. Students return to school to begin another year of learning and engaging in the rigors of the academic challenges, no matter what level be it grammar school, high school or university or graduate school. Overall, the summer vacation time has ended. The wonderful trips are fond memories and daily life becomes routine and people settle into the various jobs or vocations that are a part of all of our lives. Very often, there is a feeling of letdown as we begin another part of the year of shorter days and bracing ourselves for the prospect of winter and bundling up to ward off the cold that is a part of the Midwest. There is also an emotional letdown as everyone engages in the schedule of work and the rigors of a schedule where there might not be a lot of down time and relaxation as there was during the summer months. People engage in the humdrum of work and not a lot of time to socialize. 
Can a Loving Parent Create Obstacles to a Child’s Grief Process?
Thursday, September 01, 2016 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
Parental bereavement is one of the most stressful experiences that a child can face. And sudden death, such as suicide, will usually impact children with some level of trauma because a primary  attachment bond has been  spontaneously disrupted, even violated, under circumstances that may have involved violence or exposure to the scene of death.  Consider that a child’s capacity to express and integrate aspects of grief will be limited by her current age and development.  But with support, a bereaved child will grow into a more mature understanding of the loss and internalize meaningful memories of the deceased parent.