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LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
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Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Father Rubey
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Father Rubey
In January, we begin a New Year and many of us have New Year’s resolutions such as losing weight, getting more exercise or doing something positive to improve our lives such as being more understanding towards our loved ones. Former Vice President Joe Biden recently came out with a memoir detailing events in his life and what he learned from the tragedies.
Empty Space
Tuesday, December 26, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a spouse’s suicide surviving parents may look into the rooms of their home and see remnants of a family life that is upside down. As a family begins to acclimate to the disorder posed by the beginning of the grief journey, it might be useful to realize that a world where meaningful structure has been disabled by a traumatic loss adds an element of strangeness in familiar spaces.

Archives:

Loss and Learning
Wednesday, July 12, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
After a sudden loss like suicide, families are reeling. Parents may feel like they have lost energy and find that hopeless feelings, apathy or frustration are affecting their interactions with children and teens. Children, in response, may be furtive and watchful of your tears and despair at home, while looking for normalcy in school or with friends outside the home.
Father Loss: Girls and Grief
Wednesday, June 28, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
I’ve been reflecting on the collective body of children’s grief work from which I’ve been privileged to learn in our LOSS Program for Children and Youth. It has been over six years now. Young people stay to talk over varying lengths of time from weeks to months to years. There are so many intervening variables that affect the grief work of a young person, and also some tricky consequences of parental loss that I have become aware of as a result of watching the development of bereaved children and teens. Sometimes I like to share my impressions and questions. Girls seem to stay involved with expressive grief work longer than boys do. Maybe this is because I am a female therapist, or maybe it has something to do with the relational sensitivities that we associate more often with females even from a young age. Whatever the causal factors, today I am writing primarily about my experience with father bereaved girls, but it opens to broader questions about identity development for daughters who lose fathers and sons who lose mothers. Make no mistake, boys can be sensitive too, and certainly experience consequences of parental loss. I do see this, but it is fair to qualify that most of my impressions at this time stem from my counseling relationships with girls whose fathers have died from suicide. And father loss does stand out in the counseling program’s history because men die from suicide at a significantly greater rate than do women.