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Newsletters & Articles


LOSS Program Office
721 N. LaSalle Street
Chicago, IL 60654

Main Line: (312) 655-7283
Fax Line: (312) 948-3340

Featured this Month:

From the Desk of Jessica Mead
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 by Jessica Mead
If you attend LOSS support group meetings you may be able to appreciate that sometimes meetings are really good, and you leave feeling energized and supported; but other times you think it was just okay, or perhaps it was not helpful at all. While we hope that most meetings are good and supportive we know that various factors can make the experience just okay for survivors at times. I have left my fair share of meetings wishing that I had said something different or connected with a lone member a bit more, but this past month I facilitated one of those exceptional meetings. I left feeling humbled, grateful and honored to be a part of the LOSS program. As the meeting started I looked around the room and had the thought that in no other sector of life would such a diverse group of people be coming together. I wondered how this eclectic group of individuals were going to relate.
Caring for Trauma Reactive Children after a Suicide Loss
Wednesday, August 16, 2017 by Cynthia Waderlow MSE, LCSW
In a suicide bereaved family it is conceivable that each survivor bears some level of trauma. The sudden intrusion of paramedics, ambulances and police with flashing lights, witnessing distraught reactions of parents and especially, exposure to the scene of death will impact the central nervous system of every family member. Even those not physically present at the time the suicide is discovered may be disturbed by intrusive imaginary images and sounds. Parents who seek counseling for their bereaved children know that this loss feels incomprehensible and has far-reaching impact. Whether a child openly shows reactivity and emotional dysregulation or has learned to mask their distress it is smart to assess for trauma. Not all traumatic experiences meet the clinical level of Posttraumatic Stress Syndrome, as defined by the DSM-5, but the extraordinary and shocking nature of suicide loss can give rise to trauma symptoms, which include intrusive remembering, emotional numbing and avoidance as well as general hyper-arousal. Intrusive remembering can look like recurrent disturbing dreams, flashbacks of the experience or heightened reactions to reminders of the loss.

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